CCM Offers “Difficult Conversations” Workshop in Vermont

April 17, 2013 by celia

A free workshop on the use of the Difficult Conversations Workbook will be offered on Thursday, May 9, 6:30-8:30 pm at the Norman Williams Public Library in Woodstock, VT. Participants will learn how to use the workbook as a guide for identifying and communicating about issues and concerns in facing chronic and incurable illnesses. The training is open to patients, family, friends, healthcare providers and clergy. The workshop will be facilitated by CCM founders Dr. Bernard Bandman and Celia Engel Bandman and will feature panel discussion with various care-giving professionals, including a palliative care physician, nurse, social worker and chaplain. The workshop is supported by a grant from the Ottauquechee Health Foundation. For information or to pre-register for this free event, call CCM at 802-442-5800 or email SpeakSooner@gmail.com .


Join Us for A Workshop in Woodstock, Vermont!

by celia

“Doctors have a hard job. Not everybody wants to have these conversations.” This insight comes from (more…)


CCM to Offer Workshop for Patients & Families at Stowe Weekend Of Hope

April 12, 2013 by celia

The Stowe Weekend of Hope is an annual forum that offers educational and inspirational programs for cancer survivors and their families. The aim of CCM’s May 4 workshop is to help patients arrive at doctors’ offices prepared to take a more active role in decisions about their care. The program will address the challenges to communication between patients facing advanced cancer, loved ones and healthcare providers. CCM founders Dr. Bernard Bandman and Celia Engel Bandman will introduce material from the Difficult Conversations Workbook, which they designed as a tool to help patients explore and communicate about such challenging subjects as prognosis, coping with uncertainty, risks and benefits of treatment options and quality-of-life issues.


Empathy Unplugged

April 4, 2013 by celia

Empathy.  It’s something all of us would agree is a valuable—and often missing—component of care.  So when (more…)