DIFFICULT CONVERSATIONS WORKBOOK:
Finding A Path Through Illness


There’s no right or wrong way to cope with a treatable but incurable illness. But clear communication about needs and concerns is critical to helping you, the patient, secure both appropriate medical care and emotional support. The Difficult Conversations Workbook uses video of fellow patients’ reflections as a framework for guided writing exercises designed to help you identify and communicate your hopes and goals for treatment and beyond.
COMMUNITY EDUCATION PROGRAMS

Our “paradigm changing” programs educate communities about the patient’s role in opening difficult and meaningful conversations with family and healthcare providers. Learn More

A MEDICAL HUMANIST'S NOTES
Celia Engel Bandman
PRESCRIBING E-MAIL
December 18, 2017 at 3:43 pm · Filed under communication, family & friends, healthcare professionals, Newly Diagnosed
As the year 2017 is coming to a close and a new year is approaching I find myself thinking about what has passed and what’s to come. ...
Dual Perspective
October 11, 2017 at 1:50 pm · Filed under communication, family & friends, healthcare professionals, Patients
  Each month I receive an online newsletter from “Cancer.Net”.  The newsletter provides approved information to help patients and families make informed healthcare decisions. A recent issue titled “What is Tumor Board?” catapulted me back in time. ...
“GOOD COMMUNICATION IS GOOD MEDICINE” ™
BREAKING NEWS

It’s been an amazing year at the Center for Communication in Medicine with our SpeakSooner programs reaching deeply into our local community and across the country - and we have big plans for 2018! We are a small non-profit doing big work and we need your support. The conversations prompted by our Difficult Conversations Toolkit hold the promise of both humanizing and reducing costs in our burgeoning healthcare system. Please use the donate button below to support our work.

The most important questions don't seem to have ready answers. But the questions themselves have a healing power once they are shared.
Rachel Naomi Remen, MD
Kitchen Table Wisdom