DIFFICULT CONVERSATIONS WORKBOOK:
Finding A Path Through Illness


There’s no right or wrong way to cope with a treatable but incurable illness. But clear communication about needs and concerns is critical to helping you, the patient, secure both appropriate medical care and emotional support. The Difficult Conversations Workbook uses video of fellow patients’ reflections as a framework for guided writing exercises designed to help you identify and communicate your hopes and goals for treatment and beyond.
COMMUNITY EDUCATION PROGRAMS

Our “paradigm changing” programs educate communities about the patient’s role in opening difficult and meaningful conversations with family and healthcare providers. Learn More

A MEDICAL HUMANIST'S NOTES
Celia Engel Bandman
Writing is Good Medicine™
May 16, 2018 at 10:08 am · Filed under communication, family & friends, Patients
Who said, “Poetry is language writing itself out of a difficult situation?” I’m not sure. What does come to mind is the poem “Late Fragment” by Raymond Carver, who was a patient at the time.  ...
…Stories as a Reminder of Love
April 27, 2018 at 8:58 am · Filed under Uncategorized
 

“Learn the art of fragmented, irrational conversations and follow the patient’s lead instead of trying to control the dialogue.”

- Zen and the Art of Coping With Alzheimer’s Denise Grady, New York Times (August 14, 2007)

Recently a colleague e-mailed me the link to Jane Brody’s New York Time’s article Alzheimer’s Patients Keep The Spark Alive by Sharing Stories.  ...
“GOOD COMMUNICATION IS GOOD MEDICINE” ™
BREAKING NEWS


Coming Up on June 7! The fourth in this spring’s "Doctors Conversation Hour" series. 

Doctors are often faced with the difficult task of breaking bad news. CCM’s innovative program offers doctors an opportunity to discuss the challenges of delivering a serious diagnosis while strengthening the doctor-patient relationship. 

The most important questions don't seem to have ready answers. But the questions themselves have a healing power once they are shared.
Rachel Naomi Remen, MD
Kitchen Table Wisdom